Power Of Attorney And Its Validity

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Because of the sensitive nature of this, power of attorneys are often only given to people that the “principal” ( the person giving the power of attorney to the agent) absolutely trusts. This can be a son or daughter, a parent or other close relations.

Do not be fooled with the name. Anybody can be given the power of attorney, even people who are not lawyers, although most of those who are given such responsibilities are family lawyers of rich people or corporate lawyers of big corporations, whose job entails them to represent the CEOs or the big bosses, which are often required to be in three places at the same time, which is of course, not humanly possible.

Power of attorney often has a scope, depending on the agreement or the dictates of the principal. In most cases, the power of attorney will only have an effect on specific cases or issues. Some will be stating a specific period of time while others will be point to more specific business dealings. For instance, a power of attorney may be granted to sign a business deal with Conglomerate X but will not be effective when signing deals with Conglomerate Y even if they are signed on the same day.

It all depends on the legal papers that accompany the power of attorney. And these papers stating the contract for the power of attorney is required to be shown before an agent can act. Some countries accept oral agreement but others like the United States rely on written documents to deem it legal. Because of the birth of the internet and the computers, powers of attorney sent over the internet or those that are electronically given are accepted in some states and also in some countries.

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